Fort Ord declared a national monument

Fort Ord declared a national monument

Fort Ord had been home to many of the individuals who had served in the U.S. military dating back to 1917, though it has gone through several names before becoming what is now known as Fort Ord. This fort was primarily used for weapon training and tactical. To this day, some 18 years after its official closing sections of Fort Ord are still marked with warning signs where underground mines remain. Those cornered off sections don’t take away from the recreational paradise that has taken over this once prestigious U.S. military fort.

President Obama declared Fort Ord a national monument and referred to Fort Ord as, "one of the crown jewels of California's coast." That is exactly what Fort Ord is. It goes on for miles and miles just outside of Monterey, California. Following the official closing in 1994, residents in and around the Monterey Peninsula have turned the old fort into a recreational wonderland. It now contains numerous bike trails and hiking paths.

Plans are underway to locate and remove the last of every underground explosive. In an effort to remove past weapons within safe parameters, the Army Corps of Engineers have taken on the task and have estimated that the cleanup will be complete by 2019.  Once this gorgeous land has been cleared of all potential threats of civilian harm, even more land will become open for enjoyment. 

Any individual who has ever trained in Fort Ord should take some time to enjoy this fort under a new light. I have actually had three relatives serve at Fort Ord, my grandfather and two uncles. All three of them have returned to see this land without the sometimes strict military life.